Meet the women’s health inventions flooding the market

Happy National Girlfriends Day!

In the spirit of the "holiday," we're sharing info about some new and popular women's health tech products. As providers, it can be tricky to stay on top of the latest trends, but it's crucial to understanding your patients' health literacy and awareness.

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Maybe your patients have mentioned Elvie? Or Ava? They’re not new friends (or, maybe they are) – they’re fancy health tech devices that have hit the market in recent years. Here’s your cheat sheet to the who, what, and why of the most popular.

Elvie: The pelvic floor exercise trainer

Elvie is a kegel exercise trainer that’s been endorsed by over 700 health and wellness professionals worldwide. Elvie leads its user in 5 minute daily workouts for her pelvic floor – all to promote better core strength, bladder control, and sex.

91% of users found that exercising with Elvie was beneficial, and 8 out of 10 women saw results in as little as two weeks. Elvie is easy to use, has custom sizing, and is safe and durable. Elvie is helping women create a strong pelvic floor to rebound from the strains of pregnancy, childbirth, and aging.

Price: $199
Website.

Ava: The ovulation tracking bracelet

Ava is a bracelet that a woman can wear at night to gain insight into her fertility, ovulation, pregnancy, and health. Ava claims that it can detect the very beginning of the fertile window, in real time, as it happens. This distinguishes it from other fertility tracking tools (which tend to detect only the last day or two of the fertile window) and the temperature method (which only confirms ovulation after the fact).

With Ava, a woman can understand how her cycle impacts her health with features like symptom tracking, trend analysis, graphs, and more. Trend analysis allows the user to see how her menstrual cycle impacts the way she feels throughout the month. And once the user is pregnant, Ava transitions her into an entirely new app experience, complete with detailed information about what to expect in each week of pregnancy. She’ll be able to continue tracking her sleep, physiological stress, and resting pulse rate, as well as compare her weekly pregnancy weight gain to standard recommendations.

Price: $199
Website.

Eve: The at-home PAP test

Eve is a personal health screening service that makes sexual health testing simple and convenient. For doctor-avoidant women experiencing symptoms, Eve provides a great solution: a self-test for common infections at home.

With Eve, a woman can screen for Chlamydia, Gonorrhea or HPV by collecting her own sample at home.  She’ll receive lab results through a secure online portal, speak with a physician if she tests positive, and get reminders on when she should conduct her next screening.

Eve was carefully developed by women, doctors, and experts – and women love it: 93% of users said that Eve was easy to use, 81% said it was preferable to a pelvic exam, and 71% said that they preferred at home rather than in a clinic.

Price: $85+ depending upon services
Website.

Clue: The period and ovulation tracker app

Clue was named the top “menstrual cycle tracking app” by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

With Clue, a woman can discover unique patterns in her menstrual cycle, track her cycle, and monitor her birth control.  It also allows users to connect with their friends and family who use the app, allowing for an interactive and collective educational experience.

The app is free and available for iPhones and Androids.

Price: Free
Website.

OM: The smart sports bra

OM is a new sports bra that provides women with stylish support, all while it monitors her heart rate and breathing and logs her results for analysis.

OM also logs her steps and streams the data to her phone via Bluetooth, allowing the app to give her personalized coaching based on her results. OM offers a variety of colors, styles, and sizes, and a purchase includes the OM bra, OM box, and USB charger.  It’s compatible with iPhones only (5S and up).

Price: $169
Website.

Recommending or selling third-party products in the clinic

Are you allowed to market your favorite products to your patients?
Are you allowed to sell a third-party’s products in your clinic? 
Can you earn a small commission on a third-party’s products sold in your clinic?
Can you have a referral agreement with a third-party? 

These are excellent and common questions we hear from providers!  A complex web of laws applies to these issues, so when in doubt, ensure that you’ve clarified the legality of your financial arrangement with any third-party.  We’re always happy to help, so please reach out with questions.

Reminder:

We make no endorsement of, nor do we warranty the quality of, any product described herein.  Jackson LLP disclaims any responsibility for the use of these products by its readers, or by the patients of its provider clients.  This information is provided solely for informational purposes, allowing providers to broaden their education about new technological advances affecting their patients.  Jackson LLP does not employ any healthcare providers, so nothing on this website should be construed to be health or wellness advice.

© 2017 Jackson LLP

 

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